Customer Relationship Management: Finding Value Drivers

Customer Relationship Management: Finding Value Drivers

Despite significant interest from both academicians and practitioners, customer relationship management (CRM) remains a huge investment with little measured payback. Intuition suggests that increased management of customer relationships should improve business performance, but this intuition has only inconsistent empirical or real world support. To remedy this situation, this study identifies a core group of expected CRM benefits and examines their ability to increase a firm’s value equity, brand equity and relationship equity which are components of customer equity. Ten propositions explore the anticipated effects of these drivers and form an agenda for future research. These propositions establish a framework for measuring CRM and supporting the link between CRM and performance. [button_link url=”http://sellingasap.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/SellingASAP-Customer_relationship_management_Finding_value_drivers.pdf”]Download/Read...
The Attenuating Effect Of Role Overload On Relationships Linking Self-efficacy And Goal Level To Work Performance

The Attenuating Effect Of Role Overload On Relationships Linking Self-efficacy And Goal Level To Work Performance

The reported research examines the moderating effects of role overload on the antecedents and consequences of self-efficacy and personal goal level in a longitudinal study conducted in an industrial selling context. The results indicate that role overload moderates the antecedent effect of perceived organizational resources on self-efficacy beliefs. They also show that role overload moderates the direct effects of both self-efficacy and goal level on performance, such that these relationships are positive when role overload is low but not significant when role overload is high. Further, the results reveal a pattern of moderated mediation, in which goal level mediates the indirect effect of self-efficacy on performance when role overload is low but not when it is high. Implications for theory and managerial practice are discussed. [button_link url=”http://sellingasap.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/SellingASAP-Role-Overload-and-Work-Performance.pdf”]Download/Read...
Firm Market Orientation And Salesperson Customer Orientation

Firm Market Orientation And Salesperson Customer Orientation

Interpersonal And Intrapersonal Influences On Customer Service And Retention In Business-to-business Buyer–seller Relationships Eli Jones, Paul Busch, Peter Dacin The authors examine the influence of a firm’s market orientation and salesperson customer orientation on buyer–seller relationships. Data from a national manufacturer’s sales force and retail trade customers were used to test the influence of sales managers’ perceptions on salesperson attitudes toward a firm’s market orientation and its salesperson customer orientation. The impact of salesperson attitudes on customers’ perceptions of service delivery and their propensity to switch suppliers was also examined. The results suggest that a firm’s market orientation positively influences salesperson work attitudes. Sales managers influence salesperson customer orientation through their organizational commitment, and salesperson customer orientation influences industrial customers’ switching intentions. [button_link url=”http://sellingasap.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/SellingASAP-Salesperson-Customer-Orientation.pdf”]Download/Read...
Technology Use On The Front Line: How Information Technology Enhances Individual Performance

Technology Use On The Front Line: How Information Technology Enhances Individual Performance

This study explores and tests a new model that links different types of technology usage to individual-level outcomes. The primary objective of this study is to examine the effects of efficient use (routinization) and effective use (infusion) along with the traditional measure of usage—namely, frequency of use—on two dimensions of individual-level outcomes: information technology enabled administrative performance and information technology-enabled salesperson performance. To maintain consistency with the existing literature, the authors examine the effects of predeployment attitude toward or acceptance of technology and pre-deployment intended use of technology. The authors discuss managerial implications and provide directions for future research. [button_link url=”http://sellingasap.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/SellingASAP-Technology-Use-and-Sales.pdf”]Download/Read...
Examining The Effect Of Salesperson Service Behavior In A Competitive Context

Examining The Effect Of Salesperson Service Behavior In A Competitive Context

Michael Ahearne & Ronald Jelinek & Eli Jones While few scholars debate the importance of doing things to improve the quality of the buyer–seller relationship, little is known about what salespeople can do after the point of the initial sale to enhance customer satisfaction and trust. On the basis of extensive exploratory interviews across professional selling domains, this research develops a set of behaviors, referred to here as “salesperson service behaviors.” Using data gathered from 358 customers, the authors empirically demonstrate the effect of these behaviors on customer satisfaction and trust and, ultimately, on an objective measure of customer share of market. The authors develop a competitive model that uniquely features customer evaluations of competing sales representatives. The results indicate that these salesperson service behaviors are important in building trust and customer satisfaction, which in turn lead to increases in customer share of market. [button_link url=”http://sellingasap.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/SellingASAP-Service-Behaviors-and-Sales.pdf”]Download/Read...

The Need for Speed: Agility Selling

In turbulent business times, organizations have sought to become more agile. Organizational agility has been asserted to require workforce agility, but thus far, little focus has been given to workers. Traditionally, salespeople have sought ways to differentiate themselves and create advantage for customers. This paper asserts that, in order to continue this tradition of differentiation and advantage, salespeople must engage in agility thinking. Agility has been studied as it applies to manufacturing processes and other firm activities. Agile salespeople have a mental dexterity at the point of customer contact. They are quick to observe opportunities and are able to anticipate customers’ ever-changing needs, wants, and preferences. This paper presents a framework for agility selling, applying concepts from the agility manufacturing literature and proffering distinct characteristics of sales force agility. The Need for Speed: Agility...